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Compliments chicken strips recalled due to possible Salmonella contamination

Compliments chicken strips recalled due to possible Salmonella contaminationOTTAWA — Sofina Foods Inc. is recalling Compliments brand Chicken Strips from the marketplace to avoid possible Salmonella illnesses.The Public Health Agency of Canada says it's investigating an outbreak of human illness and has identified this product as a source of illness.The affected product was sold nationally until May 1, 2019 in 907 gram packages with a best before date of Nov. 24, 2019. Anyone who has the chicken strips should either throw them out or return them to the store where they were purchased. The Canadian Press


Feds lay out proposed new rules for voice, video recorders in locomotives

Feds lay out proposed new rules for voice, video recorders in locomotivesOTTAWA — The federal Liberals have laid out their proposal for rules around voice and data recorders on locomotives, specifying when companies can use the devices to address safety concerns and how workers' privacy will be protected.Legislation passed by Parliament required the government to come up with regulations for the recorders, which are similar to "black boxes" on airplanes.Transport Canada wants to limit companies' uses of the recorders' data to instances where there is reason to believe that crew activities led to a collision or derailment or similar incident and only to a small window of time.The rules are subject to a 60-day consultation period, after which the federal cabinet would have to enact the regulations, which likely won't occur until after this fall's election. The 18 rail companies subject of the new rules would then have two years to have recorders installed — a process that is estimated to cost $76 million, according to a federal analysis.Transport Minister Marc Garneau said the devices will make Canada's rail system safer."Having these devices at the very least will help us understand when there is an accident ... what was the cause of that accident and that in itself will help us to lower the possiblity that that same cause will be responsible for subsequent accidents," he said.When legislators debated the proposal two years ago, Unifor, Teamsters Canada and the federal privacy commissioner all raised concerns that the recording devices could be used for discipline that has nothing to do with a rail incident.There were also concerns about what happens to the data on the recorders when trains cross the border with the United States.The proposed regulations say that rail companies will have to respect requirements under the federal private-sector privacy law, including rules on how the information must be handled and who can access it and strict limits on its use to situations like federal investigations."It is a decision we have taken because of safety motivations, but we're very conscious of the fact that we must be sensitive to privacy rights," Garneau said."We very, very carefully, I believe, have crafted these regulations to ensure that privacy is addressed while at the same time having access to the information in a number of situations."And the regulations also detail what could be considered a threat to railway safety, such as using cellphones or personal entertainment devices execpt as provided by company policies, and consuming alcohol or drugs."We wanted to deliberately define those so there wouldn't be any arbitrary determination of other kinds of things going on that would be considered a threat," Garneau said.The Canadian Press


'No questions asked:' Winnipeg parish prays statue's head is returned

'No questions asked:' Winnipeg parish prays statue's head is returnedWINNIPEG — Members of a Winnipeg church are praying that the head of a bronze statue created by a well-known sculptor and blessed by a pope will be returned.


Wilson-Raybould, Philpott to announce political futures in ridings

Wilson-Raybould, Philpott to announce political futures in ridingsOTTAWA — Two former Liberal cabinet ministers who resigned over the SNC-Lavalin controversy are set to announce their next moves on Monday.Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott say they'll announce their political futures at events held at the same time in their ridings.Wilson-Raybould is the independent MP for the B.C. riding of Vancouver Granville and Philpott is the independent MP for the Ontario riding of Markham-Stouffville.Neither is saying what they have in mind, other than that constituents have been invited to meet with them as they share announcements about their political futures. Wilson-Raybould served as justice minister in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's cabinet before she was shuffled to the portfolio of veterans affairs in January.She later revealed she thought the decision to move her out of the justice role was motivated by her handling of a request to intervene in the criminal prosecution of the Quebec engineering giant, SNC-Lavalin.Wilson-Raybould gave four hours of testimony to the House of Commons justice committee in February detailing sustained pressure she felt over a period of four months to head off the company's prosecution on corruption charges related to contracts in Libya.Philpott, a former health minister, Indigenous-services minister and president of the Treasury Board, resigned from cabinet in early March over Trudeau's handling of the affair.In early April, both were ousted from the Liberal caucus.The Canadian Press


Prime Minister hears NS praise on environmental spending, as protesters arrested

Prime Minister hears NS praise on environmental spending, as protesters arrestedANTIGONISH, N.S. — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau received praise and drew protests Friday for his government's environmental policies as he met with one of the country's two remaining Liberal premiers.Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil thanked Trudeau for providing "a good start" to the costs of cleaning up a lagoon near Pictou Landing First Nation where decades of contaminated pulp mill waste has accumulated. The gratitude came as the two prepared to hold talks at an Antigonish community centre and the day after Ottawa pledged to spend $100 million to help clean up one of Nova Scotia's most polluted sites.The Boat Harbour lagoons near the Pictou Landing First Nation are contaminated with millions of litres of treated waste water from the nearby Northern Pulp kraft pulp mill.The federal money will be used to restore the lagoons to their natural state as a tidal estuary that empties into the Northumberland Strait.Later in the evening during a speech to the party's annual meeting McNeil repeated his praise, and vowed to work hard to help the federal party in the fall federal election."The Trudeau government announced an ... investment in helping us deal with the wrong of Boat Harbour, and that cleanup will happen," said the premier.However, as the two leaders met, a group of about a dozen protesters made clear that they're dissatisfied with the Trudeau government's measures to reduce carbon emissions — and its support of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion project.Two members of the Extinction Rebellion direct action group were arrested for blocking traffic, saying as they were led away that carbon taxes introduced by the Trudeau government aren't going far enough in efforts to reduce carbon emissions.As he was assisted into a police vehicle, Patrick Yancey said, "I'm being arrested for refusing to move out of the way here, because we've tried everything else and we need the politicians to listen and get the climate targets in line with 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming."A report last year by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC, concluded that while it's technically possible to cap global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius by the end of the century, it is highly unlikely.The report says achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement Canada signed onto would require a dramatic overhaul of the global economy, including a shift away from fossil fuels.Yancey's wife, Moraig MacGillivray, 40, said it was the second time her husband has been arrested and she expected he'd be released before long."We're here to send a message to Justin Trudeau that the climate emergency is urgent and the way the prime minister is investing in new pipelines is not the way to proceed," she said."As citizens we can't sit back and watch this any longer."In his speech to the Liberal partisans, Trudeau simply didn't mention a significant court victory supporting the Trans Mountain pipeline and expansion project his government has purchased for $4.5 billion.Just hours earlier, the B.C. Court of Appeal ruled against the British Columbia government's efforts to stall the project, concluding it can't restrict oil shipments through its bordersTrudeau focused his speech on economic issues and a familiar litany of criticisms of the Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, whose party is now leading the Liberals in the polls.The prime minister emphasized his government had co-operated with provincial counterparts — in contrast to former prime minister Stephen Harper's more confrontational approach with premiers.He also cited the Trump administration's decision last week to lift its controversial tariffs on Canadian and Mexican steel and aluminum as an example that the federal Liberals remained focused on protecting jobs."Canadians are counting on us to continue to improve their standard of living," he told the audience.— Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter. Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press


Saturday 25th of May 2019 09:58:49

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